Author: Ed Boltz
1. Bachelor of Arts degree in English Literature from Washington University, 1993. 2. Juris Doctor degree from George Washington University, 1996. Admissions to Practice of Law: North Carolina Bar, 1996. Federal District Courts for the Eastern and Middle Districts of North Carolina. Specialty Certification: North Carolina State Bar: Certified as a Specialist in Consumer Bankruptcy. Areas of Practice: Practice limited to consumer and business debtor bankruptcy law, 1998 to present. Memberships: National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys (NACBA). North Carolina Academy of Trial Lawyers (NCATL). North Carolina Bar Association, Bankruptcy Section. Lectures prepared and presented: North Carolina Academy of Trial Lawyers seminar on bankruptcy; Topic: Counseling the Consumer Debtor Prior to Court - C.Y.A. Forms to Help 'Gird They Loins'; 2001. Middle District Bankruptcy Seminar; Topic: Preparing Chapter 13 Plans; 2002. NACBA National Convention; Topic: Efficient Office Practices; 2003. NACBA National Convention; Topic: Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13 Debates; 2004. Middle District Bankruptcy Seminar; Topic: Chapter 7 & 13 Hot Issues; 2004. Positions held: NACBA National Convention; Convention Chair; 2008. NACBA National Convention; Panel Moderator: Topic: Basic Bankruptcy Issues; 2008. NACBA National Convention; Panel Moderator; Topic: Chapter 13-Disposable Income and Other Issues; 2007. NACBA National Convention; Panel Moderator; Topic: Representing Members of the Military and Their Families; 2007. NACBA, Member of National Board of Directors, 2006 to present. NCATL, Chair of the Bankruptcy Section, 2003 to 2007. NACBA, Chair of the North Carolina Section, 2003 to 2007. NC Bar Association, Bankruptcy Section, Bankruptcy Council Member, 2004 to present.

E.D.N.C.: Spoor v. Barth- Denial of Sanctions and Vexatious Multiplication of Litigation

Summary:

Mr. Barth commenced an adversary proceeding seeking a declaratory judgment that various state court actions by Mr. Spoor could have been brought by the bankruptcy trustee, who had previously signed a release of such actions, and that Mr. Spoor should be required to dismiss those actions. The bankruptcy court instead dismissed Mr. Barth’s adversary proceeding on the grounds that such relief was prohibited by the Anti-Injunction Act, 28 U.S.C. § 2283. The bankruptcy court declined, however, to award the sanctions sought by Mr. Spoor pursuant to North Carolina Rule of Civil Procedure 11, 28 U.S.C. § 1927, 11 U.S.C. § 105, and Bankruptcy Rule 9011, against Mr.… Read More

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Law Review: Darolia, Rajeev & Ritter, Dubravka – Strategic Default Among Private Student Loan Debtors: Evidence from Bankruptcy Reform

Abstract:

Bankruptcy reform in 2005 restricted debtors’ ability to discharge private student loan debt. The reform was motivated by the perceived incentive of some borrowers to file bankruptcy under Chapter 7 even if they had, or expected to have, sufficient income to service their debt. Using a national sample of credit bureau files, we examine whether private student loan borrowers distinctly adjusted their Chapter 7 bankruptcy filing behavior in response to the reform. We do not find evidence to indicate that the moral hazard associated with dischargeability appreciably affected the behavior of private student loan debtors prior to the policy.

Commentary:

As the authors conclude that, absent any evidence of moral hazard by allowing borrowers to discharge private student loans, “policymakers are faced with the challenge of weighing the burden placed by restrictions to bankruptcy protection on struggling nonopportunistic debtors against the benefits of expanded credit availability.”

While certainly a valuable corrective to the prevailing belief that borrowers are the parties that game the system, this study is only partially accurate or complete.… Read More

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Bankr. E.D.N.C.: In re Spirakis – Subrogation of Creditors Rights to Third Party Payee

Summary:

Through a complicated series of transactions and guarantees, Georgia Spiliotis sought to subrogate to the rights of Bank of North Carolina against the debtors, Nicolas & Mary Spirakis.

The bankruptcy court first differentiated between conventional subrogation, “is founded upon the
agreement of the parties.” Joyner v. Reflector Co., 176 N.C. 274, 276, 97 S.E. 44, 46 (1918), and legal subrogation which “is an equitable remedy applied as a “means to substitute, to put one
person in the place of another; and is usually exercised where one person has become liable for, or
has been compelled to pay money for, another.” Vaughan v.… Read More

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W.D.N.C.: Morgen v.  Student Loan Finance Corporation- Forum Selection ClauseW.D.N.C.: Morgen v.  Student Loan Finance Corporation- Forum Selection Clause

Summary:

Ms.  Morgen brought suit alleging violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act and Student Loan Finance (“SLF”) moved for a change of venue to South Dakota based on a forum selection clause in the contract.
Ms.  Morgen’s initial objection that the loan applications and promissory notes proffered by SLF  had no affidavits from record keepers   denied as the court held that such would be precluded as evidence in a consideration of a motion for summary judgment, but, in part because “there is no plausible contention that these documents are inauthentic,”  allowed them for determination of venue.

In evaluating the forum selection clause,   the  court  first determined  whether it was  mandatory or permissive, with only mandatory forum selection being binding. … Read More

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E.D.N.C.: In re Clark- In Rem Relief; Stay Pending Appeal

Summary:

The bankruptcy court granted the Motion for in rem relief sought by Wells Fargo pursuant to 11 U.S.C. § 362(d)(4), as to Mr. Clark and his wife, further barring Mr. Clark from filing any bankruptcy in the Eastern District of North Carolina for one year.

In denying the Mr. Clark’s motion for stay pending appeal and for a writ of supersedes, the district denied such finding the Mr. Clark had not made a clear showing that he had a likelihood of success in the appeal and agreeing with the bankruptcy court that Mr. Clark would not suffer irreparable harm in the absence of a stay, as he had been in default on the mortgage for 4.5 years.… Read More

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Bankr. E.D.N.C.: Mouhtadi v. Sheikh- Failure to Respond to Discovery and Summary Judgment

Summary:

After initially filing Chapter 13, Mr. Sheikh converted to Chapter 7 and Mssrs. Mouhtadi and Khalioui commenced an adversary proceeding asserting claims of common-law fraud, violations of the North Carolina Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practices Act (the “UDTPA”), N.C. Gen. Stat.
§§ 75-1.1 to 75-145, and eeking a determination that the debts related to the case were excepted from discharge pursuant to 11 U.S.C. §§ 523(a)(2) or (a)(4). Mr. Shaikh filed an answer to the complaint, but then failed to respond to numerous discovery requests, including admissions. When Mr. Shaikh still failed to comply with discovery following the entry of an order to compel, Mouhtadi and Khalioui moved for summary judgment.… Read More

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Bankr. W.D.N.C.: In re Moe’s Rx Clinic, Inc.- Dismissal of Pharmaceutical Asset Case

Summary:

A pharmacy filed Ch. 7, with its primary asset being $40-50,000 in drug inventory. Upon the motion of the Trustee, the court found that the FDA and NC Pharmacy Board had specific procedures regarding the proper handling and disposal of prescription drugs that those entities were better able to follow than the Trustee. Accordingly, as there were no other assets, dismissal was proper to allow the Pharmacy Board to dispose of the drugs. (This case was subsequently appealed, but that was dismissed with the agreement of the debtor.)

Commentary:

It does not appear that either abandonment of these drugs by the bankruptcy estate pursuant to 11 U.S.C.… Read More

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Law Review: Pardo, Rafael I.- Bankrupt Slaves

Abstract:

Responsible societies reckon with the pernicious and ugly chapters in their histories. Wherever we look around, there exist ever-present reminders of how we failed as a society in permitting the enslavement of millions of black men, women, and children in the first century of this nation’s history. No corner of society remains unstained. As such, it is incumbent on institutions to confront their involvement in this horrific past so as to fully comprehend the kaleidoscopic nature of institutional complicity in legitimating and entrenching slavery. Only by doing so can we properly continue the march of progress, finding ways to improve society, not letting the errors of our way define us, yet at the same time never forgetting them.… Read More

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Bankr. M.D.N.C.: In re Calloway- Domestic Support Obligations and Good Faith in Chapter 13

Summary:

Ms. Calloway divorced Mr. Bowles and shortly before a final judgment was entered in their equitable distribution proceeding, she filed Chapter 13. Just prior to Ms. Calloway’s bankruptcy filing, the state court judge circulated a preliminary ruling to the parties via email, stating that he believed an unequal distribution of the marital assets in favor of Mr. Bowles would be equitable and that Ms. Calloway would be required was to pay a total of $50,514 by means of monthly payments of $300, due to the her liquidation of two retirement accounts, which had a total value of roughly $31,000. Additionally, since their separation, Ms.… Read More

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Bankr.  M.D.N.C.: In re Price- Separate Classification of Student Loans in Chapter 13Bankr.  M.D.N.C.: In re Price- Separate Classification of Student Loans in Chapter 13

Summary:

The Prices, who are above median income debtors, but nonetheless have negative projected disposable monthly and no non-exempt assets, proposed an estimated 15% dividend to the class of dischargeable general unsecured creditors, which totaled $11,728.38.  They also proposed to separately classify the  $10,463.48 claim by Navient for non-dischargeable student loans.  The Chapter 13 Trustee supported confirmation, but the Bankruptcy Administrator filed a limited objection to such treatment.
The bankruptcy court first addressed whether the prohibition in  §1322(b)(1) against “unfair discrimination” in favor of one class of unsecured creditors was applicable as  §1322(b)(5) allows the a plan to cure and maintain payments on “any unsecured claim … on which the last payment is due after the date on which the final payment under the plan is due.”  While recognizing a split in opinions on this question, the court held that since §1322(b)(5) specifically applies despite the limitations in §1322(b)(2), it does not similarly explicitly override the “unfair discrimination” restrictions in §1322(b)(1). … Read More

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